£40,000 to live alone in London, new research finds

The 2017 ‘Rent Affordability Index’ research, carried out by nested.com, shows that the average salary for a singleton to live alone in London has soared to more than £40,000/yr, and a family of four need an income of more than £75,000/yr

The research shows that London is the 11th most expensive city in the world to live in, based on a square footage alone, we however know utilities and goods and services tend to be much, much, higher in UK and London in particular.

The report continues to identify that an individual earning The London Living Wage of £9.75hr would need to work 12hrs, every day of the year to reach this income threshold. 

When looking at city comparators across the U.K.- London unsurprisingly takes the stop spot, but what is shocking is the difference between London’s first place (£39,876.84) and 2nd  (£20,737.20) places is £19,139.64, almost 50% variance. 

Update: some have written to say that they disagree with this average rents for their area. Consistently, but only anecdotally, said they’re higher, in London or otherwise. That aside, this blog is focussed more about the loss of the life stage of living by yourself, whether as a transition army between professional sharer and starting a family, but equally about the financial trap individuals, who may have had a relationship breakdown, but can not afford to live alone. This will disproportionately affect women, and those less economically active.

In January 2014, Land Registry figures showed average house prices across the whole of England and Wales were £168,536, but in London the average was £409,881 (143% higher than the England/Wales rate). This house price gap has been growing ever larger, with London experiencing 10.9% growth over the last year, compared to 4.2% across England and Wales.

The same picture is apparent in the private rented sector, with the the England rental rate runnings at £665 a month in January 2014, compared to £1,516 a month in London (128% higher than the England rate). The differential in local authority rented property is less exaggerated but still significant, with average rent across England running at £79 a week in 2012/13, compared to £99 in London (25% higher than the England average).

London Weighting is not the answerUnison’s Bargaining Support Unit undertook a review for 2013/14 into London Weighting across seven sectors, this ‘top up’ is pitiful compared to the cost differential.

But what can Lewisham do?

Next week I’ll be attending my new role on Lewisham’s Poverty Taskforce, alongside Joseph Rowntree Foundation and the Trust for London, looking   This came off the back of work I undertook in my Lewisham Councillor Scrutiny role, 

The Committee will be pursuing the following issues:

  •  Tackling in-work poverty in the borough
  •  Tackling out-of-work poverty, namely for pensioners relying on state pensions
  •  Tackling poverty prevalent amongst young families struggling with a
    combination of housing and child care costs
  •  Ensuring residents are proactively informed about legislative changes that
    could impact both positively and negatively on their income and general
    financial welfare
  •  Staying up-to-date on legislative changes and advise on appropriate changes
    to the Council’s work accordingly.

2017 ‘Rent Affordability Index’

Table 1

Table 2


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Thought: No More Left & Right?

‘Politics in Britain is changing’ says think tank –  8 new tribes exists made up of both left & right parties.

Full research here: http://opinium.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Dead-Centre-British-politics4_lr.pdf

A quick sweep of each tribe:

(8%) Democratic socialists: Pro-immigration, pro-welfare state, pro-redistribution of wealth, internationalist outlook.

60% Labour : 2% Conservative
85% Remain : 3% Leave
48% Corbyn : 30% Neither : 15% May
Mostly middle to upper classes living in urban areas or in Scotland and Wales.
60% female
66% middle to upper class : 34% working class
Supportive of: staying in single market after Brexit, progressive taxation
Against: NHS privatisation, reducing net migration
(5%) Community: Redistribution of wealth, scepticism of business and capitalism. More closed off view of Britain and broadly anti-immigration. Describe themselves as centrists.

50% Labour : 12% Conservative
47% Remain : 39% Leave
36% Corbyn : 26% May
The working class in Northern England and the Midlands
59% female
Supportive of: banning zero-hours contracts, reducing net migration
Against: NHS privatisation, building nuclear power plants
(11%) Progressives: Open, internationalist and inclusive view of Britain, comfortable with immigration. Belief in the welfare state, balanced view towards tax and the economy.

50% Labour : 22% Conservative
74% Remain : 12% Leave
43% May : 24% Neither : 19% Corbyn
A scattering of professional groups across the UK
55% female
63% middle to upper class : 37% working class
Quite high employment
Supportive of: staying in single market post Brexit, progressive taxation, mansion tax
Against: NHS privatisation, grammar schools
(7%) Swing voters: Mixture of views. Support an equal, multicultural society, internationalist outlook, hard stance on benefits, support a low tax economy. Describe themselves as centrists.

37% Conservative : 33% Labour
51% Remain : 31% Leave
High numbers (17% – 21%) do not vote
51% May : 19% Corbyn
A scattering of demographic groups spread across England outside of the capital
61% female
Supportive of: banning zero hours contracts; benefits claimants to do compulsory work; mansion tax; progressive taxation; government should grow the economy and provide public services
No strong opposition to any policies
(6%) New Britain: Open capitalist economy, pro-immigration, pro-single market, supportive of a low tax economy. Business friendly, internationalist, compassionate view of society.

56% Conservative : 32% Other/Did not vote
66% Remain : 26% Leave
53% May : 24% Corbyn
Younger successful professionals, many of them managerial, living in London
62% Male
Supportive of: deficit reduction, low tax, NHS privatisation, staying in single market after Brexit
Against: progressive taxation, re-nationalising the railways
(7%) Free Liberals: Strong faith in the market, little interest in socially conservative ideas. Strongly pro-business, the most opposed to the welfare state. The most personally optimistic. Describe themselves as right-wing.

58% Conservative : 27% Labour
62: Remain : 32% Leave
61% May : 22% Corbyn
Young, mainly male, professionals living in London
79% Male
75% middle-upper class
Supportive of: benefits claimants to do compulsory work, NHS privatisation, deficit reduction, building new nuclear plants
Against: re-nationalising the railways
(26%) Common sense: Don’t think of themselves as having particularly strong political opinions, despite supporting similar policies to the ‘Our Britain’ segment. Clear preference for low tax economy, opposition to immigration.

62% Conservative : 15% Labour : 13% UKIP
59% Leave : 34% Remain
71% May : 17% Neither : 5% Corbyn
Older Southern Englanders, either advanced in their careers or retirees
53% Female
Supportive of: reducing net migration, benefits claimants to do compulsory work, changing human rights law, new grammar schools
Against: staying in single market after Brexit, proportional representation
(24%) Our Britain: Closed perception of what Britishness is. Anti-immigration, government should put Brits first at all costs, broadly isolationist in outlook. Describe themselves as centrists.

38% Conservative : 37% UKIP : 19% Labour
80% Leave : 11% Remain
59% May : 24% Neither : 7% Corbyn
The older working class and retirees, living mainly in Northern England and the Midlands.
52% Female
Supportive of: reducing net migration, changing human rights law, benefits claimants to do compulsory work, banning zero-hours contracts
Against: staying in single market after Brexit, NHS privatisation
A fuller picture can be seen on the Opinium website.

Fighting racism, xenophobia and bigotry: that’s a “Peace of Cake”…

All faiths mosaic built by Lewishams Community

All faiths mosaic built by Lewishams Community


This morning I had the pleasure of sharing a good old cuppa and a piece of cake at a pan-community peace event in Catford. 


Like most brilliant ideas the concept is simple – get our communities together to bust myths and stereotypes, and build a proper community, all through the medium of shared experiences and cake!

PEACE OF CAKE EVENT – Goldsmiths Community Centre

As a born’n’bred Lewisham lad, I’ve grown up in and around diversity my whole life – I believe I’ve become a richer person from it, and I know Lewisham has too. From those vital migrant workers that keep our NHS and Lewisham Hospital going, to the work of our faith communities: Masjids and Synagogues; Churches and Meeting Houses, that have provided our young with youth groups to play in, community actions to improve our ‘health and wellbeing’, and worked tirelessly to build a united and tolerant community for us to live in. We are also blessed with scores of excellent community groups that ensure those of us either: smaller in number; or less likely to have a say, have an equal voice at the table – Lewisham’s Disability Coalition, Lewisham’s LGBT+ group, Association for Refugees in Lewisham (AfRIL), and Lewisham’s Pensioners Forum, to name but a few from a near endless list.

For those of you that know me in the slightest, you’ll know I’ve always had a strong sense of justice, and fighting inequality is something I’ve been passionate about for most of my life. I’ve never liked bullies, I certainly am not going to allow them to divide our community. The best way for us to beat these ‘bullies’ is to stand united, and don’t let complacency aide them – we are the majority.

Get involved:

Adversity brings the best out in our community time and time again and there’s loads of ways that you can show your support of a multicultural diverse community:

Talk about it: let people know that we’re better for it, the strange irony of the rise in intolerance is that’s it’s coming from those communities where diversity is often lacking. Communities like Lewisham’s that have been multicultural for decades, seen a high libel of migrants join our communities aren’t so much bothered by it, because we’ve been exposed, our presumptions confounded and crucially we’ve all lived and benefitted from it. From the fun and spectacle of things like Nottinghill Carnival to the everyday: our children being best friends, our colleagues at work coming from diverse 

Sign the Pledge: I’m proud to have got Lewisham Council to talk and do something around the rise of racism, xenophobia and bigotry, you can add your voice too. Click here to sign the pledge.

Get involved: with Hope not Hate’s More in Common campaign in Lewisham. The country was rocked and saddened by the assassination of Jo Cox MP, no more so than her Labour Party colleagues, but out of adversity comes hope, and as part of Jo’s Legacy Hope not Hate are delivering a local task forces to deliver community action activities. You can get involved in Lewisham’s here.

Host a ‘Peace of Cake’ event of your own!

The “Peace of Cake” team are keen for more community coffee mornings to be organised, so much so they’ll be producing a “How to” guide shortly on how to get a good community conversation going. To find out more visit here.

Grants for community activity in #RusheyGreen, Catford

 Rushey Green Ward – Assembly Fund 2016 -17

On Tuesday evening I had pleasure in launching this years Rushey Green Assembly fund for local community led activities and initiatives, and I’m looking forward to seeing and judging all the applications that come in.

Our funding priorities are:

1. Activities and opportunities for children (under 18) and young people (under 25)

2. Increasing opportunities for older people (55+)

3. Community cohesion – including events, activities and projects designed to create a sense of community in Rushey Green

4. Culture and the arts with particular reference to improving the wellbeing of people in the Rushey Green Area

5. Improving your local area including local ‘streetscape’, environment and ecology

The deadline for completed applications is:

1st September 2016

How to apply:

For an application form and guidance on how to apply, please contact Laura Luckhurst, Community Development Officer:

Email:

laura.luckhurst@lewisham.gov.uk

Tel: ​​020 8314 3830

You can also view and download the application forms and guidance at: http://www.lewisham.gov.uk/localassemblies

Rushey Green Ward Boundary

JUSTICE for LEWISHAM HOSPITAL Week

Justice for Lewisham Hospital Week - Catford Broadway Theatre

Justice for Lewisham Hospital Week – Catford Broadway Theatre

This week is Justice for Lewisham Hospital week follow the campaign at http://www.savelewishamhospital.com/

 

 

 

Joining the 10,000 Hands Campaign @10000hands – an inspirational campaign

James-J Walsh caught red handed supporting the 10,000 hands campaign

James-J Walsh caught red handed supporting the 10,000 hands campaign

Earlier this week I was lucky enough to catch up with the 10,000 campaigns – an innovative campaign led by young people to make Lewisham a safer place for all its residents. Camilla, 19 (pictured center left) has been working on projects making Lewisham a better place for teenagers since Year 7 and is a truly inspirational young woman. The project now hopes to collect enough hand prints to wrap City Hall in.

More about the group can be found by visiting their website here

Continue reading

Government needs to do more for 1 in six children in total poverty

Major charities have come together to criticise the inaction and damaging domestic policies of David Cameron and Nick Cleggs Tory-Liberal coalition government.

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Over the last year 300,000 more families have fallen into extreme hardship, with their net family income at less than £250 per week or less

Anne Marie Carrie Chief Exec of Barnardo’s said the government was not doing enough to help families ‘at the tipping point between hardship and crisis’, she continued ‘families already budgeting on a shoe string, squeezed by the rising price if essentials and high childcare bills. Tis year many households will be pushed into financial chaos when the cap on benefit increases takes effect, compromising the health and life chances of children.’

Continue reading

Say #No2BNPinLewisham – This Saturday

It was always inevitable that the BNP would try to build support on the back of the Woolwich killing. However, rather than demonstrating in Woolwich on Saturday as it was first thought (and a UAF anti-racist festival/demo will be going ahead at 12 noon in General Gordon Square, Woolwich), the BNP have now announced that they now plan to march (or take cars) away from Woolwich and converge on the Lewisham Islamic Centre (which is close to Lewisham Hospital) instead.

We have a responsibility to stand shoulder to shoulder with our neighbours our friends and our citizens to say we will not tolerate racism we will not tolerate islamophobia

If you’d like to counter protest with me please let me know ASAP

 

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Barratt Homes confirmed as Catford Dog Track Developer with 1/5th affordable housing

The former Catford Stadium is to be turned into more than 500 homes, the Mayor of London has announced.

The original planning application approval proved to be ugly controversial because of the design and density of the build – splitting the vote of the council.

The historic greyhound track in south London closed in 2003 after years of falling attendances.

Boris Johnson said the £117m redevelopment, by Barratt Homes, would create more than 1,000 jobs, on the assumption of two jobs for each home.

He said 113 of the 589 properties would be for “affordable rent”, and 60 would be earmarked for shared ownership.

Mr Johnson said there was “unprecedented demand” for housing
The 4.7 hectare site was owned by leisure group Wembley when it was a greyhound track, before being acquired by English Partnerships in 2004. It was destroyed by fire the following year.

The land was transferred to the Greater London Authority last year under the Localism Act.

Mr Johnson said London’s “unbeatable allure” meant “unprecedented demand for housing”.

He added: “The transformation of Catford Dogs, which for the last decade has been left empty and unused, will not only bring hundreds of new homes to the heart of London, but will feed into the wider regeneration of Catford Town Centre.”

The mayor said the redevelopment would make the area “an even better place to live” and inject new jobs and growth “into one of the capital’s key opportunity areas”.

Catford Stadium was founded in 1932 and attracted large crowds until the legalisation of betting shops in 1961, which hit attendances at tracks throughout the country.

Work on the development is expected to start by early 2014 and be completed by 2017.