Government needs to do more for 1 in six children in total poverty

Major charities have come together to criticise the inaction and damaging domestic policies of David Cameron and Nick Cleggs Tory-Liberal coalition government.

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Over the last year 300,000 more families have fallen into extreme hardship, with their net family income at less than £250 per week or less

Anne Marie Carrie Chief Exec of Barnardo’s said the government was not doing enough to help families ‘at the tipping point between hardship and crisis’, she continued ‘families already budgeting on a shoe string, squeezed by the rising price if essentials and high childcare bills. Tis year many households will be pushed into financial chaos when the cap on benefit increases takes effect, compromising the health and life chances of children.’

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We have until Monday to #LobbyALord to come @Out4Marriage!

We have until Monday to #LobbyALord to come @Out4Marriage!

URGENT! We need you to #LobbyALord to come @Out4Marriage! visit http://www.LobbyALord.org

The fight for Equal Marriage has never been closer or harder than it will be in the House of Lords, it’s vital that we lobby as many peers as we can to come Out4Marriage – Love is the same, straight or gay

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£37bn & counting

The war in Afghanistan is the War the media has forgot. With at best sporadic coverage of the conflict now shown on news services in the UK some people are now calling the conflict ‘a political, financial and moral disaster’. The role of the media, and their lack of coverage, is part of the reason there has been less public debate on tactics and the merits and the strategy of this conflict… It’s simply forgotten. In past times a major conflict of this scale would have been big news, but even casualty reports are relegated to the second half of the news cycle now a days.

From the Guardian:

“The war in Afghanistan has cost Britain at least £37bn and the figure will rise to a sum equivalent to more than £2,000 for every taxpaying household, according to a devastating critique of the UK’s role in the conflict.

“Since 2006, on a conservative estimate, it has cost £15m a day to maintain Britain’s military presence in Helmand province. The equivalent of £25,000 will have been spent for every one of Helmand’s 1.5 million inhabitants, more than most of them will earn in a lifetime, it says.

“By 2020, the author of a new book says, Britain will have spent at least £40bn on its Afghan campaign, enough to recruit over 5,000 police officers or nurses and pay for them throughout their careers. It could fund free tuition for all students in British higher education for 10 years.

“… In the first full attempted audit of what he calls Britain’s “last imperial war”, Frank Ledwidge, author of Investment in Blood, published next week by Yale University Press, estimates British troops in Helmand have killed at least 500 non-combatants. About half of these have been officially admitted and Britain has paid compensation to the victims’ families.”

#Budget: The increase in the personal tax allowance will mean an income boost of just 32p a week for most of the lowest earning income tax payers.

Today the Chancellor announced a further increase in the personal tax allowance. He claims helps struggling families. But who benefits most?

 

Tax relief not supportive

The rise in the personal tax allowance mainly benefits the top income deciles. as shown by this chart produced by the Resolution Foundation: http://www.resolutionfoundation.org/blog/2013/Mar/20/easing-squeeze-tax-cut-all/

This policy does not help those at the bottom much because they either don’t pay tax, or get most of any extra allowance tapered back as their Housing Benefit and Council Tax Benefit is cut. The regressive nature of the policy is show in this Resolution Foundation chart.

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Government U-Turn on Alcohol Pricing

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Cabinet Climb Down on Alcohol Pricing leaves Cameron red-faced again

PLANS to bring in a minimum price for alcohol look set to be dropped after a Cabinet revolt.
The idea, which experts say could cut 2,000 drink-related deaths in a decade, ran into opposition from ministers including home secretary Theresa May (pictured), education secretary Michael Gove, Eric Pickles and Andrew Lansley. They have privately told David Cameron they are opposed to the plan, for England and Wales, after the drinks industry produced its own research suggesting it would have little effect on problem drinkers or crime – Reports The Metro
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